10 Highly Sensitive Disney Characters

Not every Disney character is a princess seeking freedom from the perfect life laid out for her or a beggar boy hoping to be a prince. If you look closely, you’ll find that some much-loved Disney characters manifest highly sensitive personalities. A few of them also have introverted characters.

Highly sensitive Disney characters are often the sidekicks, the shy and unobtrusive ones. But sometimes you’ll find them playing lead roles.

These highly sensitive Disney characters are some of the more complex personalities you’ll find in a Disney movie.

Some might be a little crusty and some more than a little cute … but all are unforgettable.

Which of these highly sensitive Disney characters do you empathize most with?

1. Flower (Bambi)

Flower No one who’s watched the classic Disney cartoon Bambi can forget the iconic character who didn’t even have the nerve to introduce himself correctly.

Instead, he simply stated, “You can call me Flower if you want to … I don’t mind.”

In fact, we never even discover his real name. We know the blue-eyed skunk from Bambi is bashful and seems to hate attention. But this highly sensitive character proves himself as a faithful friend … except when he wants to sleep (all winter long). 

And yes, we know how much HSPs need their sleep!

2. Bailey (Finding Dory)

BaileyThis highly sensitive Disney character has a keen (and probably overwhelming) sense of hearing (any HSPs out there relate?).

What is more, he lacks confidence in himself, a common issue many introverts and HSPs face.

It takes a close friend (Destiney) and a crazy newcomer (Dory) to convince Bailey that maybe there is life beyond his safe spaces.

But we’re pretty sure he’ll always be on the shy and sensitive side, no matter where he might end up in the big, wide world.

3. Sadness (Inside Out)

Sadness First of all, raise your hand (or just nod slightly) if you cried more than once while watching this movie.

And another nod if you could totally relate to Sadness, a softspoken and sensitive character whose personality is the exact opposite of Joy.

I so loved this movie!

And I loved the character, Sadness.

Sadness is certain that she ruined things by affecting one of Riley’s core memories … infusing her with … well … sadness. But her sensitive nature proves to be a vital part of Riley’s psyche.

Sometimes you just need someone to cry with, and Sadness, with her highly sensitive personality, knew how to do just that.

4. Kristoff (Frozen)

KristoffThis might seem like a stretch, but remember Kristoff’s song to Sven?

“Reindeer are better than people …” even if people do smell better than reindeer.

If you’re a highly sensitive person, you’ve doubtless had moments (or long seasons) where you’ve preferred animal company to humans.

And when Olaf the snowman sang that famous song about summer, Kristoff was deeply concerned about Olaf’s innocence and repeated, “Someone needs to tell him.”

However, he was too sensitive to warn him outright, “You’re gonna melt!”

As highly sensitive people tend to do, Kristoff probably thought about the problem deeply for ages … at least, until Olaf received his own personal flurry and the crisis was averted.

5. Bashful (Snow White)

bashfulIf you’re a highly sensitive person, Bashful is probably your favorite dwarf (though depending on your mood, Grumpy might be a close second).

Bashful has a secret crush on Snow White, but can rarely stammer out much more than “Oh, gosh,” when he finds himself the subject of her attention.

How many times have you, as a highly sensitive person, found yourself at a complete lack for words when someone you like tries to talk to you?

Bashful loves sugar and flowers, plays an instrument, and appreciates beauty. Need I say more?

6. Jiminy Cricket (Pinocchio)

Jiminy CricketSpeaking of appreciating beauty, Jiminy Cricket surely had a crush on the lovely Blue Fairy, who dubbed him Pinocchio’s conscience.

Although reserved and realistic, Jiminy Cricket still embraced the daunting task wholeheartedly. 

As an HSP, you’ve likely held the uncomfortable position of serving as “conscience” to a friend or family member, whether you’ve wanted to or not.

If nothing else, you’ve probably thought it: That’s not the right way to go and they’ll end up disappointed or hurt.

But you stayed true to your friend no matter what they chose. You can likely relate to Jiminy Cricket, who stuck by Pinocchio … even when he turned into a donkey or ended up in the belly of a sea monster.

7. Archimedes (The Sword in the Stone)

archimedesThis Disney movie is not the most well-known one, but if you’ve watched it, you probably loved one character more than the rest …

Archimedes might come across as a crusty old owl who wants nothing more than a bit more sleep … but if you’re a highly sensitive introvert, you’ve undoubtedly had those days where you were more than a little grumpy because you were tired.

He is easily offended, such as when he and Merlin are given the coldest, draftiest room in the castle. (And as much as we hate to admit it, we HSPs do get offended easily.)

However, when Arthur’s life is in danger, Archimedes risks his own safety to rescue the boy. When Merlin asks him about it, though, the owl acts as though he did nothing of the sort.

Sometimes HSPs are unlikely heroes. Even in Disney movies.

8. Milo (Atlantis)

Milo ThatchSpeaking of less-well-known Disney films, Atlantis, which was released in 2001, might not have been the most popular (possibly due to the lack of a Disney princess for the first half of the movie).

But Milo, the lead character, held his own as an awkward, highly sensitive genius.

A linguist and cartographer who finished high school at 11 and declined both Harvard and Princeton, Milo Thatch is a dream-chaser, reluctant to give up his hopes that the lost city of Atlantis really does exist.

Eventually, he leads a group of scientists to Atlantis, not knowing everyone but him is in it for the money.

In spite of his awkwardness, his sensitivity and honesty bring all but the biggest villains to his side, and his courage helps to renew a dying land.

Seriously, you should watch it.

9. Alice (Alice in Wonderland)

Alice in WonderlandDo any other of you HSPs love using your vivid imagination to escape the real world on a regular basis?

I can relate, and so can Alice.

In both the movie and the books by Lewis Caroll, she loved reading, but not boring, visionless books.

Alice wanted something that would capture her imagination and bring it to life … which is just what happens when she tumbles down the rabbit hole.

Alice cries a river … literally, and finds herself in adventure after adventure … all the while seeking a way to get back home.

Highly sensitive people are homebodies, after all.  

10. Belle (Beauty and the Beast)

BelleAnd yes, sometimes the highly sensitive person actually gets a starring role as the Disney princess.

This is the case with Belle, the daydreaming singer who is rarely seen without a book in her hands.

Even though no one could deny the truth of her name as meaning beautiful, the townspeople still state, “I’m afraid she’s rather odd–very different from the rest of us.”

Different … but that’s not necessarily bad.

After all, Belle had the sensitive nature needed to see the beauty hidden deep within a terrifying beast, enabling him to transform into his true self.

And that, really, is the gift of a highly sensitive person, whether in a Disney movie or in real life …

To seek for and recognize beauty and worth, even when it’s deeply hidden.

And sometimes to coax it to life or resurrect it from the ashes.

Did I Forget any Disney HSPs?

So, which of these highly sensitive Disney characters is your favorite?

And if I left anyone out, whom you consider highly sensitive, leave a comment and I will add them or maybe put together another list.

HSP Field Notes on Loaning Books to Friends

Loaning BooksFirst of all, why would you be loaning books to friends?

Well, as a highly sensitive person, you consider your books some of your closest friends.

Your living and breathing friends are also your friends.

(Therein lies the problem.)

You love a good book and the thrill of emotion that stories can provide.

  • Books have healed you.
  • They’ve made you cry.
  • Books have made you smile and laugh.
  • Sometimes they’ve changed your life.

So, you want to share those joys with your friends (the human friends, not the friends that live between the pages).

So you loan your book to a friend.

The next time you see them, you eagerly ask what they thought of the book that you loaned.

They say something like this:

“Oh, I haven’t gotten around to reading it yet, but I can’t wait to find the time.”

You notice they post about a dozen times an hour on Facebook, but you don’t mention that.

You might ask the question once more, but you get another:

“Sorry, I haven’t had a chance to read it yet.”

You don’t ask again about the book you loaned them.

Why?

As a highly sensitive person, here are three main reasons:

  1. You don’t want to seem like a burden or an irritation.
  2. You definitely don’t want to seem desperate.
  3. But you don’t want to make your friend feel uncomfortable about the fact that you loaned them a book three months ago (or six months ago or two years ago) and they still haven’t read it.

But you remember.

You remember every book that you’ve loaned.

Although you might not remember exactly when the book changed hands and was no longer in your possession, you know who is currently in possession of the book.

And sometimes, when you notice the place on your bookshelf where the book used to be, you imagine where it might be in your friend’s house.

  • Is it on one of their bookshelves?
  • Did it end up in a box and get stuffed in their garage?
  • Might it be on their bedside table, meaning they really do plan to read it soon?
  • Did they move it along while following Marie Kondo’s advice?

So, to protect your highly sensitive self from the nagging worry of where your book-friends might be suffering some horrible fate, you decide you’ll never loan a book again.

Then your friend stops by for a visit

And when they ask what’s new, you happen to mention, “I just read the most amazing book.”

Your friend expresses an interest and you decide you’ll try it … Just. One. Last. Time.

So you loan them your book … and it begins all over again.

_______

Photo by Theo Crazzolara on Foter.com / CC BY

10 Signs You’re a Highly Sensitive Person

Signs of a Highly Sensitive Person

But even if you found a few things in common with the highly sensitive person test, you’re still not quite sure if you are one.

In this article, we want to make it easier for you to determine whether or not you really are an HSP.

So, read on to discover 10 signs you’re a highly sensitive person …

1. You cry easily

Now, before you quickly write off this point and say, “No, that’s not me,” think about it more deeply.

Culture has a lot more bearing than we sometimes realize on some aspects of our nature.

For example, as a highly sensitive person, you might frequently blink back the tears or push them down just because “It’s not manly to cry,” or “Big girls don’t cry.”

But while growing up, perhaps you found yourself crying more easily than friends.

And these days, you still make sure you have a few tissues in your purse or back pocket when going to the movies … just in case.

2. You grew up hearing, “You’re too sensitive.”

About that crying … even though you couldn’t help it, did you still get reactions from people such as:

  • It’s not a big deal.
  • There’s nothing to cry about.
  • Why are you being so sensitive?
  • You’re just too sensitive.

If so, you’re likely a highly sensitive person … and that’s nothing to be ashamed of.

If it bothers you, try coming up with a return comment when people say it.

Maybe …

  • You’re not sensitive enough.
  • You’re too insensitive.

Or my favorite:

  • The world needs more sensitive people.

3. You need alone time

It’s not that you don’t like people … you do.

In fact, as a highly sensitive person, you likely empathize with people more deeply than non-HSPs.

Therein lies the issue.

Because you are more sensitive to attitudes, nonverbal language, and moods, it can be exhausting to hang out among people.

  • And this doesn’t just mean strangers.
  • Sometimes you need a break from your own family.

Highly sensitive people need time alone to recharge and process or decompress after spending time with people.

4. You find yourself calmed by nature

You’ve likely discovered that your environment greatly influences your mood.

Perhaps you also know by now that the simple act of stepping into a peaceful backyard or taking a walk in a park does something special to your psyche.

In fact, “Being in nature, or even viewing scenes of nature, reduces anger, fear, and stress and increases pleasant feelings.” (Source)

How much more so for highly sensitive people who find themselves more susceptible to issues of stress and anxiety?

If you find yourself feeling stressed or pressure, try going outside for even a few minutes.

Spending a few minutes under a beautiful blue sky or surrounded by trees and greenery can make all the difference.

5. You need more sleep than others

Growing up, you might have been one of the few children who didn’t mind hearing a parent say, “It’s nap time!”

Even if you didn’t love sleeping as a young child, if you are a highly sensitive person, there was likely a point in time when you realized that you enjoyed resting.

While everyone in the world today needs sleep, HSPs really do need more sleep than others.

Because highly sensitive people have deep processing systems and easily get overwhelmed, they feel refreshed and recalibrated by sleep.

When a highly sensitive person reaches that point of exhaustion, nothing will do besides taking a nap (or getting a full night’s sleep).

6. You try to avoid conflict

If conflict causes you higher levels of anxiety or stress than the average person, you’re likely a highly sensitive person.

Whether it’s competitiveness among family members or competition in the workplace, you try to stay far away from it.

And that’s a good thing!

There is altogether too much conflict in this world and we need a few more peacemakers.

7. Beauty affects you deeply

Although you feel deeply affected by the negative side of life, such as conflict and competition, the positive side influences you just as intensely.

As a highly sensitive person, you might find yourself at the point of tears when listening to a moving song (and wanting to replay the song a dozen times to experience the feeling again and again).

Or you might be driving somewhere and catch sight of a magnificent sunset or even a single tree growing in the center of a field, and want nothing more than to stop and take in the beauty and the feeling that it gives you.

And what do you do when you can’t get a vision of beauty out of your head?

8. You seek ways to express creativity

Highly sensitive people experience things deeply, and not only turn to music and poetry and art to enjoy, but also as a mode of creative expression.

Many musicians, artists, and other creatives are likely HSPs and they define themselves as shy, sensitive, and introverted.

Being a highly sensitive person might mean you seek ways to create art through making music, or writing poetry or short stories.

9. You feel drained by “small talk”

If you are a highly sensitive person, the worst thing about parties is not the loud music or even the crowd.

It’s the small talk.

It’s the necessity to listen to acquaintances talk about fashion and clothes and shoes and sports and all those topics that really have no worth.

This does not only mean face-to-face interaction.

It can also mean engaging in online discussions. An HSP can get totally drained by reading a dozen comments on a post, even if the issue being discussed is not drawing conflict.

While interacting online and via social media can provide an extra boundary, it can still feel tiring for a highly sensitive person.

10. You think deeply about past interactions

You might remember nearly every word of a discussion that took place years ago.

What is more, those interactions and conversations affected you deeply.

And that’s okay. It’s part of being a deep person and a deep processor.

You’re not alone.

If you find yourself struggling with the memories of harsh or difficult interactions, reach out to someone in your personal support group (a friend or family member) to talk about it.

Sometimes all it takes is having someone to talk with to help you move beyond a difficult memory.

The Beauty of a Highly Sensitive Person

So, maybe you’re just realizing you’re a highly sensitive person.

If you’re new to the concept, please know that being an HSP is not a character flaw or a disorder.

It is the way you are wired … the way your mind processes information, and has done so since you were born.

I recommend that you learn what you can about highly sensitive people and that you connect with others.

Look around you.

There might already be a few in your circle or community that you just never realized were HSPs.

It takes all kinds of people in this world …

And highly sensitive people are a beautiful part of it.

That includes you!